Sack of Lunenburg
by American privateers

1 July 1782

sack – to plunder a city, town, etc.,
usually by the soldiers of a victorious army, or by pirates

plunder – to rob a place of goods, valuables, etc.,
by forcible means, especially as done in war


Photographs of
Plaque

Lunenburg
Lunenburg County
Nova Scotia

Located at the intersection of Falkland Street with Victoria Road

GPS location:   44°22'37"N   64°19'10"W




Sack of Lunenburg plaque
Plaque installed 1953
Photographed on 17 May 2003


Sack of Lunenburg plaque
Looking northeast
Photographed on 10 July 2003


Also see:   The other side of this monument





Links to Relevant Websites

Sack of Lunenburg National Historic Event of Canada
    http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/lhn-nhs/
        det_E.asp?site_id=1075&name=Sack+of+Lunenburg


Sack of Lunenburg, 1 July 1782
    http://www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/lunenburg/archives.asp?ID=6


Privateers and the American Revolution
...It is estimated that 2,000 privateer commissions were issued (by the
rebelling colonies) and that between 250 and 400 privateer ships were
always functioning during the late 1770s. The smallest of the colonies,
Rhode Island, sent out fifty-seven privateer ships...
    http://www.allsands.com/privateersameri_wq_gn.htm


Privateer
Privateer, in international law, is a term applied to a privately owned armed
vessel whose owners are commissioned by a belligerent nation to carry on naval
warfare. Such naval commissions or authorizations are called letters of marque.
Privateering is distinguished from piracy, which is carried out without enlistment
by a government. Privateering was abolished by the Declaration of Paris of 1856,
but the declaration was not supported by the United States, Spain, Mexico, and
Venezuela...
    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Styx/2188/privater.htm


American Maritime Documents, 1776-1860: Letter of Marque/Privateer Commission
...Letters of Marque were licenses granted by a monarch or government to
privately-owned vessels, enabling them under certain conditions to war against
the shipping of an enemy nation. The word marque, from the French, was used in
this sense to mean a pledge to seize or capture. Vessels carrying these
documents were popularly known as privateers ... During the American Revolution
the Continental Congress adopted a printed form with blank spaces for the name
of the vessel, owners and master, and figures for tonnage, guns an crew. These
blank commissions, signed by the President of Congress, were sent out to the
United Colonies, who assumed primary responsibility for the regulation and
conduct of their own privateer fleets...
    http://www.mysticseaport.org/library/initiative/
        ImText.cfm?BibID=6405&ChapterId=23


Privateer's Kit
Reproductions of all the forms you need to set out on the high seas against
the British. A letter of Marque authorized the captain to capture British ships and
sell the cargoes at public auction. Not only did a captain need a Letter of Marque,
he also had to post a Privateer's bond stating that he would not violate
international law. The captain also received a set of instructions from Congress,
which lay out all of the laws and rules that he must follow to be considered
a privateer and not a pirate...
    http://www.sullivanpress.com/Revolution.htm







Photographs of War Memorials, Historic Monuments and Plaques in Nova Scotia
    /remem/plaques.html



Schooner Bluenose plaque Schooner Bluenose plaque Lunenburg
    /lunenco/bluenosem.html


William Roue, Millennium Plaque Millennium Plaque: William Roue Dartmouth
    /hfxrm/roueplq.html


Montbeliard monument Montbeliard monument Lunenburg
    /lunenco/montbeliard.html


Blockhouse Hill cannon Blockhouse Hill cannon Lunenburg
    /lunenco/blockhsecann.html


Camp Norway memorial Camp Norway memorial Lunenburg
    /lunenco/norwaycmp.html


Lunenburg Temperance Fountain Temperance Fountain Lunenburg
    /lunenco/temperftn.html


Fort Point monument Fort Point monument LaHave
    /lunenco/lahavefpm.html


Riverport war memorial Riverport war memorial Riverport
    /lunenco/riverport.html


Mosher memorial Mosher memorial Lower LaHave
    /lunenco/moshermem.html


Five Houses cannon Five Houses cannon Lower LaHave
    /lunenco/5housescann.html


Riverport: John Philip Ritcey monument Ritcey monument Riverport
    /lunenco/ritceymon.html


Veterans' Memorial Bridge Bridgewater
    /lunenco/bridgelahave.html


Military Engineers: Gold River Bridge Military Engineers Gold River Bridge
    /lunenco/goldriver.html


Military Engineers: Martins River Bridge Military Engineers Martins River Bridge
    /lunenco/martinsriver.html


Chester Basin: Delbert Webber, blacksmith shop Delbert Webber, blacksmith shop Chester Basin
    /lunenco/webberdel.html


Chester Basin war memorial Chester Basin war memorial Chester Basin
    /lunenco/chbasinm.html


New Ross war memorial New Ross war memorial
    /lunenco/rossmem.html


Western Shore war memorial Western Shore war memorial
    /lunenco/weshore.html


Chester war memorial Chester war memorial
    /lunenco/chesmem.html


Chester firemen memorial Chester volunteer firemen memorial
    /lunenco/chesfire.html



Go To:   Index to other online Nova Scotia History
    http://alts.net/ns1625/histindx.html

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    http://alts.net/ns1625/automobiles.html

Go To:   History of Telephone Companies in Nova Scotia
    http://alts.net/ns1625/telephone.html

Go To:   History of Railway Companies in Nova Scotia
    http://alts.net/ns1625/railways.html

Go To:   History of Electric Companies in Nova Scotia
    http://alts.net/ns1625/electric.html

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    http://alts.net/ns1625/quotes.html

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First uploaded to Internet:   2003 September 09
1